@_@''

bijoux-et-mineraux:

Opal Bivalve Fossils - Coober Pedy, Australia

bijoux-et-mineraux:

Opal Bivalve Fossils - Coober Pedy, Australia

(Source: fineart.ha.com, via mineralists)

— 2 minutes ago with 923 notes
#opal  #rockin  #fossils 

anthrocentric:

somethingvain:

stuffhappening:

all autocompletes were screenshots of actual searches on 12/3/2013

photo credit: Mike Allen

This Photoshoot

The idea was inspired by the UN Women campaign by Memac Ogilvy & Mather Dubai. 

Racism from Absence

In my 19 years in America, I’ve never been stopped and frisked. Cops are always nice to me. People have no problems sitting next to me on the bus. No one’s scared of me no matter what direction I pointed my cap. 

The kind of Asian racism that makes headlines is cultural misappropriation -when some “insensitive” entertainer wears silk kimonos and painted faces to look exotic.

This never bothered me.

It’s the subtle, slippery racism that’s far more sinister. The absence of Asian leads in a non-martial arts movie or TV shows means I grew up knowing only non-Asian celebrities and role models. And if you’re an Asian guy, you are not the stuff of fantasies girls grew up dreaming about.

The absence of Asians from politics and upper management means that Asians can be hard workers and geniuses but never leaders.

Above all, there seems to be some perma-foreignness about Asians. It’s not unusual to be told to “go back to China” and to be mocked for an accent we don’t have. The manifestations of this viewpoint range from the seemingly harmless to the outright hostile. But the underlying message is the same. Asians are not real Americans.

Inspirational Racism

I vividly remember seeing this racism first-hand in a conversation with one of my former business partners. I wanted to create a mentoring program in a predominantly Asian school organization.

He flat out told me he had no interest in helping Asians succeed in America. I asked him, “Are you serious?” He said, “Yeah.” He laughed a little.

He was serious.

It was a wtf moment for many reasons and was a major factor behind my decision to leave my position as a co-founder. I eventually heard from a mutual friend that he said I was a follower not a leader.

In retrospect, I’m fortunate to have heard him verbalize something that others keep to themselves. It allowed me to move on to bigger and better things instead of wasting time working with someone who never saw me as a partner. 

This is the most important post I’ve seen in a while. Racism from absence is something that is predominant here on tumblr, which is shocking because this is the most politically correct and representative platform I have in my life. It’s not okay to joke about transgendered individuals, it’s not okay to joke about racism against black people, but apparently it is always okay to joke about Asians. Perhaps it’s because the internet is so US-centric, but the only POCs I’ve ever seen recognized or represented seem to be african-american/black, and calls for the end of institutionalized racism tend to ignore the equally long history of oppresion many Asian countries have suffered, and Asian immigrants in western countries continue to suffer. Ask yourself this: in a world where Asians make up the majority of the global population, have you ever seen Asian individuals valorized for anything other than being aberrations of the Asian culture? Wait- can you even name more than 10 Asian individuals valorized to the extent of mainstream popularity? 

As an Asian in an international school, I’ve seen this type of subtle racism enacted every single day. When I work hard to achieve something and the results reflect my hard work, the response I most typically hear is “it’s because you’re Asian.” To hear that the hours I put into trying to be the best individual I could possibly be, coming home at 9PM after gymnastics to do homework late into the night and sleeping at insanely late hours or trying to balance Junior Achievement with community service, were not enough to gain recognition as Jasmine Chia and not simply another faceless slant-eyed member of the Asian ethnicity makes me truly wonder what it takes for an Asian to be represented in this world. My experience is something familiar to any other Asian who has had contact with the Western world:

Here is what I sometimes suspect my face signifies to other Americans: an invisible person, barely distinguishable from a mass of faces that resemble it. A conspicuous person standing apart from the crowd and yet devoid of any individuality. An icon of so much that the culture pretends to honor but that it in fact patronizes and exploits. Not just people “who are good at math” and play the violin, but a mass of stifled, repressed, abused, conformist quasi-robots who simply do not matter, socially or culturally. (source)

Next time we ask for POC representation in media, don’t forget Asians. Next time we see a piece of Asian amazingness, whether it’s He Kexin on the beam or Doona Bae in Cloud Atlas, take the time to humanize them instead of thinking of them simply as representatives of the Chinese gymnastics industry or the rising Korean wave of actors. When an Asian person is genuinely good at music, recognize that they worked hard for it. When an Asian chess prodigy wins the world championship, learn their name and not just the country they come from. Don’t pretend to get angry on behalf of geishas at cultural appropriation if you don’t stand up for the fact that cultural appropriation is the only form of recognition we get in mainstream media. 

It’s up to you and me. As a fashion blog, I say post more Asian models, more Asian designers. This is not about fighting against some oppresive power, but fighting to make space in a silence that defines Asian existence. My existence. 

Let’s not forget that there’s also varying levels of racism associated to the Asian identity. The attitudes towards East Asians, South Asians, and Southeast Asians are remarkably different — even though their cultures have all intermingled at different parts throughout history. The stereotypes of “Asian-ness” are all exaggerations of East Asians, while most South Asians aren’t even considered Asian by non-Asians. As for Southeast Asians, there’s internalized racism involved along with a long going history between East and Southeast Asians that have created the same mentality that current Americans have towards the Latin@ population. Unlike the commenters above, I and many other Southeast Asians have been regularly referred to as “the Mexicans of Asia,” which is offensive in so many levels (along with other, more specific, derogatory terms), and sadly, that phrase was always said by fellow Asians.

There is a long history of oppression between groups in Asia that has lasted for centuries before Western civilization even considered exploring east. However, due to the constant, oppressive power of a Western world through globalization and colonialism, this internalized and externalized racism is not only exemplified, but horribly disfigured to accommodate Western ideals. The Asian community is HUGE and while half of the Asian community (cough, East Asians) is exonerated and experience the racism stated above, the experiences of South Asians and Southeast Asians are completely different. True, in past history, East Asians have been racially profiled and physically abused, but that has started to decrease. South Asians are constantly attacked and lumped together, their identities stripped to only “Indian,” forced to deal with the stereotypes and racism of that identity. Due to the recent arrival of Southeast Asians to America (and the circumstances in which they travelled) many Southeast Asians live in low income communities and within their own racial category, consistently have the highest poverty rates. It’s to the point where Southeast Asians are racially profiled by the police and police have entered homes without a warrant and assaulted families (I also experienced this firsthand along with many other people I know). Where more than half of Khmer, Laotian, and Vietnamese people drop out of high school. Or that Hmong people (an ethnic group) are treated so harshly not just by Western society, but even by other Asian groups and subgroups that in official government documents, they get their own category and are monitored and profiled. That there’s a HUGE difference in poverty levels just within Asian identities

So yes, it’s true that not all Asians are stopped and frisked by the police. Only those Asians with higher levels of melanin and don’t fit within the “Asian Stereotype.” 

The above commentators tiptoe around the “Model Minority Myth.” The Model Minority™ is only given to people who have reached acceptable levels of “Whiteness.” True, many East Asians are no longer as publicly abused or mistreated, but like they said, it’s all silent. The discrimination and racism happens in the backfolds of law, government, corporations, etc. As for those who were unfortunate enough to have slightly above accepted levels of melanin, the abuse is public and loud. And often times, internalized racism from those trying to reach the Model Minority™ will be sure to continue to add on to this inequality by distancing themselves (which is dumb on itself, because it makes you a perpetual foreigner and only perpetuates animosity within the Asian community). It’s even worse if you so happen to identify with the LGBTQ+ community

How the fuck are you going to just lump together 6th generation Chinese Americans, Indian immigrants, and Hmong war refugees? Their histories are so vastly different. Their backgrounds will be the determining factor on why they’re treated a certain way. There’s inequality among the Asian community. It has a lot to do with politics and cultural identities, but these lumping of of identities ends up erasing actual struggles and experiences of Asian subcategories. 

Asian Americans do experience racism. Asians do experience racism regardless of where they are in the world. The manifestations of racism and discrimination will vary depending on one’s ethnic heritage, but it is very much real. It is present because of our institutions and which only continues to uphold microaggressions within the Asian community.

(via spikievstheworld)

— 1 hour ago with 21751 notes
#important 

rionhunter:

I made a response to this, but unfortunately, tumblr has a way of eating up anything more than 10 lines long, and it got a little lost.  So, even though I’m not Hank, I thought I would make a full post explaining the science. 

To understand why it’s happening, though, I’m going to have to quickly explain to you what is happening first.

Hopefully we all know that animation (and film) is just a collection of images, flashed in quick succession.  The motion that we see, however, is pieced together in our brains, thanks to a thing called ‘persistence of vision’.

Persistence of Vision is caused by the lag in your brain.  Seriously.
That brief instant it takes for your brain to understand what it’s seeing is the reason you’re able to watch movies.  And we should be thankful for that brief instant.

Light comes into your eyeballs, and it’s crazy hectic data.  There’s so much stuff happening all the time everywhere.  And while our brains are good, they can’t process everything they’re seeing at light speed.  Everything we perceive through our retinas is just light, bouncing off other things.  We all know that, but it’s something we often forget.

The brain processes one instant of reality, then a snapshot of the next, and then the next, and so on, and pieces them together to create motion.

This is everything.  This is your entire reality.  The perception of instances blended together to form a delicious smoothy of senses.

For motion to be consistent, however, what it’s seeing needs to resemble what it was seeing the moment before.  For example, for objectX to look like it’s moving, it needs to mostly be where it was the microsecond before, but slightly not.

Basically, you need to think about those ol’ claymations kids make, where the lego slowly edges fowards.  You need to take that concept, and apply it to everything you’ve ever known and loved.

If objectX doesn’t overlap where it was before, it’ll look liked it appeared there out of nowhere or a whole new objectX.  This is when the illusion of movement is broken.  It doesn’t occur in live-action movies or reality as much, because it’s hard to break the illusion of reality when you’re in reality, whereas to create a realistic perception of reality, from nothing, on a screen?

Yeah, a little trickier.

In an industry setting, animators have to create at least 25 frames for every second of footage (FPS).  And sometimes, in that 25 frames, animators need to have something move so fast on a frame, that it doesn’t overlap its previous self.

Their solution, as you probably know, is to stretch and contort their object in a way that’s not dissimilar from motion blur with cameras.  Especially when you acknowledge that motion blur is everything that’s happening for that 1/25th of a second.

Again, a lot of this is common knowledge, but it’s a matter of how it all pieces together to work.

As you can see here, in figure A, the hotdogs are smoothly sliding out at a consistent speed, which means, if you were to mark each spot they were in every frame, the marks would make a straight line.

The intervals between each marking isn’t very much, because they’re moving quite slowly.  The hotdogs are mostly overlapping themselves between each frame.

Now remember that the illusion of movement is all in your brain, where it looks for something that resembled the instant before, and projects trajectory into your concious.

The only reason you’re able to reverse the flow of hotdogs is because they look so similar, and because it’s literally all in your head.

When you make yourself think the flow of hotdogs is going into this fine gentleman’s pants, you’re making yourself believe that, in one frame, hotdogX moves almost a whole hotdog length down, instead of only a little bit of a hotdog length up.

And because it’s almost a whole hotdog length down, in just one frame, the distance of the intervals along the hotdog’s trajectory increases, which means it travels more distance in the same amount of time. 

In that one instance of perceived reality (IPR)(Don’t use that anywhere serious, I just made that up), the hotdog moves 9 pixels, instead of 2 (approx.)(I’m not going to count them)

So, to summarize the answer to your question (aka TL:DR);

The reason why the ‘dogs fly into his pants faster is because your brain lag enables you to perceive motion through light  (it likes things that look the same).  And when things look the same, you can screw with your brain something hardcore. 
When you force your brain to see things at different intervals, it can change how you perceive them.

(via edwardspoonhands)

— 2 hours ago with 9100 notes
#details  #motion 
"he inhaled his scent. he smelled of (ingredient 1), (ingredient 2) and something undefinable, that was uniquely (name of buttsex partner)"
every single fanfiction uploaded in the last two years oh my god  (via brood-of-froods)

(via nepenthegold)

— 2 hours ago with 2772 notes
#tidbits  #bad writing is bad 
Topic:DIVERSITY IN THE MARVEL UNIVERSE
Anthony Mackie:We’re in a day and age where kids deserve someone they can look up to. I’m very proud of Scarlett with what she’s been able to do with Black Widow, and how little girls can sit back and see that she doesn’t have to have superpowers, she’s just a badass. While being cool and a chick. And I like the fact that little brown kids can say, ‘hey, the Falcon is there now’, and little green kids can say, ‘the Hulk’s there’. Don’t want to leave out the Martians. I think it’s very important, and I think Marvel has been at the forefront of that, giving people the opportunity to represent every aspect of culture. It’s definitely something that was on the table, and on my mind when I decided to sign on to this project.
Topic:FANS COMPLAINING ABOUT CASTING ON GROUNDS OF RACE
Anthony Mackie:Superman, black would be the coolest dude in the world. Imagine Sam Jackson in a cape. Running around. That would be a good movie.
I think what a lot of people don’t get is, these people aren’t real. If you cast a black dude as John F Kennedy, that’s wrong. If you cast a white dude as Martin Luther King, that’s wrong. These people aren’t real. The suits aren’t real. There aren’t really superheroes in the world.
At some point in time, you have to steep yourself in reality and say, ‘hey, it’s not about what they look like, it’s about casting a good actor in the role. If you’re sitting at home and you can’t see a black guy as Nick Fury, maybe there’s something wrong with you.
— 3 hours ago with 11683 notes
#important  #the times 

mintchocotea:

boyfriendhook:

In which Jaime required coffee in order to sit through the wedding vows. [x]

OMFG BEST MISTAKE EVER

(Source: maimedlion, via safelovedwise)

— 3 hours ago with 99901 notes
#2014  #those must have been some boring ass wedding vows 

fartymcmly:

cute date ideas:

  • follow birds around
  • talk to birds
  • draw birds together
  • go to the zoo to look at the birds
  • go shopping and buy shirts with birds on them
  • birds

(via wilwheaton)

— 3 hours ago with 9283 notes
#tidbits  #yes 

Chris Evans and Sebastian Stan, Captain America: The Winter Soldier, behind the scenes.

(Source: bloodbuzz-smartypants, via screwds)

— 3 hours ago with 8046 notes
#motion  #these two  #2014 
thebrainscoop:

okrooart:

I feel bad for not updating regularly these days, so I’ve decided to show what I’ve been working on all this time. As mentioned in my previous post, I’ve been hired to draw illustrations for a children’s alphabet book focusing on unusual looking animals. Here is the current state of the illustration for letter “A” (I hesitate to use the word “final draft” because I may decide to fiddle around with colors and edit details later on, buuut this is more or less finished.) I’m currently working on the letter “K”, but for now I think this is a good sample showing where I am! I’m also going to try to upload other art more frequently, so stay tuned.

I met Hilary last week when she came to one of my presentations at The Field Museum. She mentioned to me me that she was working on illustrating a children’s book about animals but she totally undersold herself; this book aims to highlight some less popular but still critically significant animals across their kingdom.
It’s easy for us to say something is ugly, or creepy, if we don’t have a strong understanding or relation to that animal, but our interpretations of what is aesthetically pleasing shouldn’t influence the inclination to support the conservation of many of these species. I’m all for pandas and tigers, but sometimes we need new interpretations in our efforts to raise awareness about conservation for some of the less photogenic lifeforms that are in desperate need of support. That’s why I believe so much in education and encouragement from a young age: we’ve got an entirely new generation that’s going to grow up to appreciate naked mole rats because they’ve been shown to us in a way that is charming, rather than eww check out this gross naked rat, which unfortunately is all too popular. 
Kudos, Hilary! #weevillove

^this

thebrainscoop:

okrooart:

I feel bad for not updating regularly these days, so I’ve decided to show what I’ve been working on all this time. As mentioned in my previous post, I’ve been hired to draw illustrations for a children’s alphabet book focusing on unusual looking animals. Here is the current state of the illustration for letter “A” (I hesitate to use the word “final draft” because I may decide to fiddle around with colors and edit details later on, buuut this is more or less finished.) I’m currently working on the letter “K”, but for now I think this is a good sample showing where I am! I’m also going to try to upload other art more frequently, so stay tuned.

I met Hilary last week when she came to one of my presentations at The Field Museum. She mentioned to me me that she was working on illustrating a children’s book about animals but she totally undersold herself; this book aims to highlight some less popular but still critically significant animals across their kingdom.

It’s easy for us to say something is ugly, or creepy, if we don’t have a strong understanding or relation to that animal, but our interpretations of what is aesthetically pleasing shouldn’t influence the inclination to support the conservation of many of these species. I’m all for pandas and tigers, but sometimes we need new interpretations in our efforts to raise awareness about conservation for some of the less photogenic lifeforms that are in desperate need of support. That’s why I believe so much in education and encouragement from a young age: we’ve got an entirely new generation that’s going to grow up to appreciate naked mole rats because they’ve been shown to us in a way that is charming, rather than eww check out this gross naked rat, which unfortunately is all too popular. 

Kudos, Hilary! #weevillove

^this

(via scientificillustration)

— 3 hours ago with 637 notes
#woah art  #important 

ancientart:

Examples of dogs represented in ancient Mexican art.

All of these artifacts date from 200 BCE to 500 CE. The first is from Nayarit, and the rest are from Colima. The dog in last photo is shown to be wearing a human mask.

Courtesy of & currently located at the LACMA, via their online collections.

(via lacma)

— 3 hours ago with 854 notes
#woah art  #history 

Sebastian Stan at Jane Eyre New York Premiere  3/9/2011

(Source: lawyerupasshole, via hackedmotionsensors)

— 3 hours ago with 13878 notes
#precious baby  #cute until he cuts your throat